Take this test to see if YOU could be suffering from OCD

  • 25-question quiz asks if you worry about keeping items in perfect order or if you repeat routine actions
  • OCD is a chronic mental health condition associated with obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour
  • It is one of the most common mental health disorders affecting between 1 and 2 per cent of the UK population
  • Results of the tests will be discussed on tonight’s episode of Embarrassing Bodies, on Channel 4 at 8pm

By
Lizzie Parry

11:13 EST, 6 May 2014


|

12:29 EST, 6 May 2014

Are you consumed by a fear of dirt and germs, obsessed with washing your hands? Do you repeat certain actions a set number of times or worry that your home may be burgled or ravaged by fire?

If so, you could be among one of the millions of people worldwide battling Obessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

OCD is a chronic mental health condition associated with obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour.

A sufferer is compelled to carry out repetitive actions or mental acts.

To take the OCD test click below

Often they feel they need to carry out their compulsion in order to prevent their obessession from becoming true.

For a sufferer obsessed with a fear of being burgled, they may feel compelled to check and re-check the locks on their doors and windows multiple times before being able to leave the house.

It is one of the most common mental health disorders, affecting between 1 and 2 per cent of the population, according to the charity OCD Action.

A test used by the Channel 4 show Embarrssing Bodies asks how you would react to a set of circumstances. It was developed by Dr Wayne Goodman of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

It features 25 key questions to give an insight as to whether a person is at risk of developing the condition.

Examples include: ‘Are you over concerned with keeping objects (such as clothing, shopping, tools) in a perfect order, or arranged exactly?’ and ‘Do you repeat routine actions a certain number of times or until it just feels right?’

So far
83,327 people have taken the OCD test, with 28 per cent of men scoring
in the highest at risk category and 36 per cent of women found to be in
the highest at risk category.

People living in northern England and Northern Ireland show the highest incidence of OCD.

Those
in the 18 to 30 age bracket were at the highest risk of suffering OCD,
with those aged between 56 and 60 found to be at lowest risk.

People
working in the food, drinks and retail sectors were more prone to the
condition, while IT workers were least likely to suffer OCD.

A test to establish whether you are at risk of developing OCD will be discussed on the Channel 4 show Embarrassing Bodies. So far of the 83,327 people who have taken the test, 28 per cent of men and 36 per cent of women scored in the highest risk category, while those living in northern England and Northern Ireland were shown to be most likely to suffer the condition. Those aged between 18 and 30 are most at risk of OCD, while people in the 56-60 age group are less likely to suffer the condition

A test to establish whether you are at risk of developing OCD will be discussed on the Channel 4 show Embarrassing Bodies. So far of the 83,327 people who have taken the test, 28 per cent of men and 36 per cent of women scored in the highest risk category, while those living in northern England and Northern Ireland were shown to be most likely to suffer the condition. Those aged between 18 and 30 are most at risk of OCD, while people in the 56-60 age group are less likely to suffer the condition

Embarrassing Bodies' OCD test

Embarrassing Bodies' OCD test

The 25-question quiz asks people how they would react to a series of circumstances to establish whether they are at risk of developing OCD

OCD is categtorised by four stages, obsession, anxiety, compulsion and temporary relief.

A
sufferer will become overwhelmed by a constant obsessive fear or
concern, such as the possibility they will contract a serious illness
through contact with germs.

Their
thoughts will develop into an anxiety and intense stress causing them
to develop a pattern of compulsive behaviour in order to reduce anxiety.

That behaviour will inspire temporary relief from the anxiety but the obsession and anxiety will return, and the cycle begins again.

A form of psychotherapy, known as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), can be successful in treating OCD.

With the right treatment, OCD can be managed very effectively with a likely reduction in the severity of the symptoms, helping achieve a good quality of life. In some cases, treatment can lead to a total cure.

The results of the tests will be discussed on tonight’s episode of Embarrassing Bodies, on Channel 4 at 8pm.

Embarrassing Bodies' OCD test

Embarrassing Bodies' OCD test

The test assesses how much time a person spends each day consumed by their obsession, and how hard it is for you to control the compulsion. The results of the test are set to be discussed live on the Channel 4 show Embarrassing Bodies

Comments (45)

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dizzydino,

somewhere, United Kingdom,

10 hours ago

I have mild OCD, and my housemates all think its great because I keep the house immaculate. However I wash my hands constantly and worry about spreading germs and dust all the time which is a pain, and the only time I feel truly relaxed is in the shower. (Imagine my water bills huh!) Thankfully my OCD isn’t as bad as some and I feel terrible for those people who have it so much more severely.

MissBobblez,

UK, United Kingdom,

16 hours ago

People joke about OCD. But it is a crucyfing illness.

heartless harry,

nottingham, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

tell you what..question ten ..I had to read that one twice…really???

Nathan,

Surrey,

1 day ago

The people who make jokes about this really should educate themselves about ocd. My mum was forced to give up a good job because of hers, she developed an ocd behaviour with punctuation, every time she sees punctuation she has to blink three times and tap three times, pretty exhausting if you are doing that all day! So now she has a job that has very little paperwork but also little pay. We lost our house and dog, ended up living in a bb for 9 months. She also has many other ocd problems that she has to do all the time. I have very minor ocd but it can get very bad if I’m stressed or anxious, constant lock checking, alarm checking, checking my money and worrying about fires (that’s a new one). Mainly I just have to check my alarm a few times before bed and check I’ve locked my door a couple of times, not worth going to the Dr about.

BB,

Bucks,

1 day ago

Please do go to the dr. My friend did and she has really benefited from a course of CBT. It really is a terrible thing to live with.

Ohforgodssake,

Birmingham, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

BIt disappointed (and confused) to see that living in the Midlands constitutes ‘Other’ under location… It’s not ‘Northern England’ or ‘Southern England’ so must be ‘Other’?!

Master of Twiddly,

New Eldorado, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

Do some basic training in HM Forces, and then come back and say you don’t suffer from a degree of OCD, which has been instilled in you via conditioning. Clean toilets are my thing.

NLSutton,

Staffordshire, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

It’s not working on my computer :-/ my boyfriend constantly jokes that I have OCD because there are a lot of things he has seen me do that he suspects is OCD… but this isn’t going to the results… so I may never know… lol

redskelf,

Bexhill, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

Nor mine. It refused to let me put my answers, and then jumped several pages.

Lara Croft,

Planet Nebula, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

It’s easy to make jokes about this sort of things, but my friends daily life is a struggle day in, day out. Not with cleaning. Intrusive thoughts, having to touch things a certain amount of times. It’s heartbreaking to see. Just wish there was a cure for it

D2,

London, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

This test is outrageoulsy ridiculous and ironically only goes to perpetuate the misunderstanding of OCD. For example, the question of whether one is worried about catching a disease or encountering harmful germs is ridiculous – of course we all are! We’re meant to be! There is a vast difference between common hygiene and OCD and this test does not make that distinction clearly enough. Please don’t all concern yourself by taking this nonsense test.

TonyMichaels,

London,

1 day ago

I think the clue is in “worried”. I don’t worry – I just take sensible precautions etc. There is a difference.

D2,

London, United Kingdom,

1 day ago

This test is outrageoulsy ridiculous and ironically only goes to perpetuate the misunderstanding of OCD. For example, the question of whether one is worried about catching a disease or encountering harmful germs is ridiculous – of course we all are! We’re meant to be! There is a vast difference between common hygiene and OCD and this test does not make that distinction clearly enough. Please don’t all concern yourself by taking this nonsense test.

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