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Researchers Publish Studies Of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder And Tourette …

Two papers that will appear in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, both receiving advance online release, may help identify gene variants that contribute to the risks of developing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or Tourette syndrome (TS). Both multi-institutional studies were led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators, and both are the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the largest groups of individuals affected by the conditions.

“Previous studies of these disorders have demonstrated that both TS and OCD are strongly heritable and may have shared genetic risk factors, but identification of specific genes has been a huge challenge,” says Jeremiah Scharf, MD, PhD, of the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit (PNGU) in the MGH Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, a co-lead author of both papers and co-chair of the Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics. “These new studies represent major steps towards understanding the underlying genetic architecture of these disorders.”

An anxiety disorder characterized by obsessions and compulsions that disrupt patients’ lives, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most common psychiatric illness. Tourette syndrome, a chronic disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics, usually begins in childhood and is often accompanied by conditions like OCD or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Both conditions have a high risk of recurrence in close relatives of affected individuals, but previous studies that compared affected and unaffected individuals were not large enough to identify specific genes or areas of the genome that contribute to risk.

Since many gene variants probably contribute to risk for both conditions, the research teams undertook GWAS investigations, which analyze hundreds of thousands of gene variants called SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in thousands of individuals with and without the condition of interest. The International OCD Foundation Genetic Collaborative, consisting of more than 20 research groups in nine countries, analyzed almost 480,000 SNPs in 1,465 individuals with OCD, more than 5,500 controls and from 400 trio samples consisting of an OCD patient and both parents. The Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics and the TS GWAS Consortium, representing 22 groups across seven countries, analyzed 484,000 SNPs across almost 1,500 cases and more than 5,200 controls.

The OCD study – led by Evelyn Stewart, MD, of the MGH-PNGU, who is now based at the University of British Columbia, and David Pauls, PhD, MGH-PNGU – identified possible associations close to a gene called BTBD3, which is closely related to a gene that may be involved in Tourette Syndrome, and within DLGAP1, a close relative of a gene that produces OCD-like symptoms in mice if it is deleted. The Tourette study was led by Scharf and Pauls and found evidence of a possible association with a gene called COL27A1, which may be expressed in the cerebellum during development, and with variants that help regulate gene expression in the frontal cortex.

None of these or other identified SNPs reached the high threshold of genome-wide significance, which would indicate that the associations represented true risk factors, and the authors stress that additional, larger studies are required. “Although GWAS analysis allows much more comprehensive examination of the entire genome than do studies focused on particular families or candidate genes, these two studies are still underpowered and should be interpreted with caution,” says Pauls, a co-senior author of both papers. “The current results are interesting and provide us with a starting point for analyzing future studies that must be done to replicate and extend these findings.”

Scharf adds that the next steps should include testing the SNPs identified by these studies in other groups of patients and controls, analyzing both study groups together to identify genes that contribute to the risk of both disorders, and expanding international collaborations to increase the size and power of patient samples for both OCD and TS. “If future studies confirm that some of these variants do contribute to risk – either directly or by altering the function of other risk genes – that would suggest both novel disease mechanisms and might give us new treatment targets,” he says.

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Canine tail chasing resembles human obsessive compulsive disorders


The genetics research group, based at the University of Helsinki and the Folkhälsan Research Center and led by Professor Hannes Lohi, has in collaboration with an international group of researchers investigated the characteristics and environmental factors associated with compulsive tail chasing in dogs. A questionnaire study covering nearly 400 dogs revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the of , the effects of early and and . The study shows that dogs offer an excellent animal model for studying the genetic background and environmental factors associated with human obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD). The study has been published in the journal PLoS ONE on July 27, 2012.

Stereotypical behavior in pets has not been studied extensively, even though several different types of compulsive behavior occur in different species including dogs. A dog may recurrently chase lights or shadows, bite or lick its own flank, pace compulsively or chase its own tail.

Different environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to predispose to compulsive behavior. Many stereotypes are breed-specific, which emphasizes the role of genes. Compulsive tail chasing occurs in several dog breeds, but worldwide it is most common in breeds such as Bull Terriers and German Shepherds.

The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of tail chasing in dogs, to identify possible environmental risk factors, and to find out whether a previously discovered gene region associated with compulsive behavior is also linked to tail chasing.

Could vitamins have an influence?

Nearly 400 Finnish dogs participated in this study, including Bull Terriers, Miniature Bull Terriers, German Shepherds and Staffordshire Bull Terriers respectively. Blood samples were taken from the dogs participating in the study, and their owners filled out a questionnaire about their dogs’ stereotypic behavior. The questionnaire included questions about different stereotypic behaviors, as well as aspects of each dog’s puppyhood and the routines of the dog’s current daily life. In addition to this the owners evaluated their dogs’ personality based on the questions in the questionnaire.

The study included dogs that chased their tails daily for several hours, dogs that chased their tails a few times a month, and dogs that had observably never chased their tails. With most of the dogs, the tail chasing had begun at the age of 3 to 6 months, before reaching sexual maturity.

One of the most interesting findings of this study is the connection with stereotypic behavior and vitamins and minerals. Dogs that received nutritional supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, with their food, chased their tails less.

“Our study does not prove an actual causal relationship between vitamins and lessened tail chasing, but interestingly similar preliminary results have been observed in human OCD” says researcher, Katriina Tiira, PhD. Follow-up studies will aim to prove whether vitamins could be beneficial in the treatment of tail chasing.

Early separation from the mother and the mother’s poor care of the puppy were also found in the study to predispose dogs to tail chasing. Early separation from the mother has been discovered to predispose also other animals to stereotypic behavior, but this is the first time this connection has been made with dogs.

The amount of exercise the dogs received or the number of activities they engaged in did not, however, seem to have a connection with tail chasing. This could be comforting news to many owners of dogs with compulsive behaviors, since often the owners themselves or the dogs’ living environment may be blamed for these behaviors. Although frustration and stress are likely to be significant causes of the occurrence of stereotypic behavior in for example zoo animals, they may be of lesser significance when it comes to Finnish dogs that are walked regularly.

Tail chasing in dogs can be used as an animal model for studying the genetic background of OCD in humans

Compared to the control dogs, tail chasers suffered more from also other stereotypic behaviors. In addition, tail chasers were more timid and afraid of loud noises.

“Different types of compulsive behavior occur simultaneously in humans suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder or other diseases such as autism” explains the head of the study, Professor Hannes Lohi.

Dogs may turn out to be of significant use in investigating the causes of human psychiatric diseases. “Stereotypic behavior occurs in spontaneously; they share the same environment with humans, and as large animals are physiologically close to humans. Furthermore, their strict breed structure aids the identification of genes.”

The gene region previously associated with compulsive flank licking and biting in Dobermans was not found to be associated with tail chasing in any of the breeds in this study. The next aim of this research project is thus to discover new gene regions connected to tail chasing.

The study is part of a larger DOGPSYCH project, funded by the European Research Council, in which the genetic background of different anxiety disorders, such as timidity, and sound sensitivity are investigated, as well as their similarities with corresponding human diseases.

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Osama bin Laden may have suffered from anxiety disorder

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Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Narrowed Down

The first genome-wide searches for the genes responsible for Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder have uncovered a few clues to the underpinnings of both disorders.

Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by muscle and vocal tics such as eye blinking, throat clearing and uttering taboo words or phrases. Tourette’s often co-occurs with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a mental illness marked by repetitive behaviors and anxiety-producing intrusive thoughts.

Neither Tourette syndrome nor OCD are simple enough to be traced to a single gene, but two new studies detailed today (Aug. 14) in the journal Molecular Psychiatry find several locations on the human chromosome that may contribute to the conditions.

“Both disorders clearly have a complex underlying genetic architecture, and these two studies lay the foundation for understanding the underlying genetic etiology of Tourette syndrome and OCD,” said Jeremiah Scharf, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, who worked on both projects. [Top 10 Controversial Psychiatric Disorders]

Genetics of Tourette Syndrome

In the Tourette syndrome study, Scharf and his colleagues compared the genomes of more than 1,200 people with the disorder with the genomes of nearly 5,000 healthy individuals. They conducted what’s called a genome-wide association study, scanning hundreds of thousands of genetic variants from across the genomes to see if any were more common in the people with the disorder.

They found that no single genetic signal was significantly different between the two genomes, meaning that the researchers could not rule out random chance as the reason for any given difference. But among the top genetic variations, the researchers found an unusually high number that influence levels of gene expression in the frontal lobe of the brain — a region important in both Tourette syndrome and OCD, Scharf said.

One intriguing gene that varied the most between Tourette- and non-Tourette genomes was called COL27A1, a gene that encodes a collagen protein found in cartilage. The same gene is also active in the cerebellum, a brain region important for motor control during development. More research will be necessary to find what link, if any, COL27A1 has to Tourette syndrome, Scharf said.

The architecture of OCD

In a separate study, the scientists carried out the same analysis on healthy genomes as well as about 1,500 people with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Again, no one gene rose to the top as a definitive OCD gene, but the results revealed a good candidate near a gene called BTBD3, which is involved in multiple cellular functions. BTBD3 is very active in the brain during childhood and adolescent development, when OCD often first appears. It’s also related to a gene called BTBD9, which has been linked to Tourette syndrome in the past.

This first genome-wide pass is bound to turn up some false positives, Scharf said, so researchers will now need to home in on the intriguing genes in larger samples of people. They are also merging the two studies to look for genetic linkages that might explain why Tourette syndrome and OCD so frequently co-occur.

“The important thing this study does is that it really brings Tourette syndrome and OCD into the company of a number of other psychiatric diseases, which people have studied using genome-wide association,” Scharf said, citing autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder as examples. “Now that we have these data for Tourette syndrome and OCD, we can work with investigators who are studying those other diseases to try to see what we can learn about what variants are shared between different neurodevelopment disorders.”

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Obsession in Childhood raises OCD risks as Adults

Obsession and Compulsion in children has raised the risks of the same issues to be found in them in their adulthood. Research done on connection of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in children with risk of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in adults showed that young children who are suffering from obsession and compulsions have a high chance of facing OCD problems at some future stage of their life. Scientists, in their research, concluded that number of Children suffering from OCD symptoms was having alarming chances of suffering from OCD in their adult life as well.

Data was taken from the Dunedin Study from New Zealand. The research had started in 1973 and data was collected from people of Dunedin. Dunedin has been the individual location across the globe where lengthy problems related to psychology have been seen. The psychological problems have been seen to be taking place from the young age of a man to the stage when he becomes an adult. Data collected from a thousand people was used in this study carried out.

A set of attributes taken from the people of age 11, 26 and 32 was taken for the sake of research and studies showed that a number of ideas related to obsession and compulsion were found in these people. These signs included unwanted thoughts such as giving problems to individuals and washing hands from time to time. These signs also included doing things that were actually without any specific reasons.

The calculations done on the basis of collected data showed that the scientists, for the first time achieved the desired results and got the proof that there exists a relation between the presence of obsession and compulsion in children and adults. When data was collected from members of research at age of 11, the people who were suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder were found to have been suffering from the same problems at the age of 26 till 32.

Details of the studies showed that the boys and girls who were a part of studies were found to be having a number of symptoms that showed signs of obsession and compulsion at the age of 11. These children were more likely than any other children to be having obsession and compulsion issues when they reached at the age of 26 or more. These children were thought to be having about six times more chances of suffering from Obsessive Compulsive disorder when they reached their adult age.

Celebrities with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a brain-related disease which produces specific thoughts in people which they are not able to control and find themselves a victim to perform unwanted actions. The symptoms of OCD are numerous and this article discusses a number of them as well as a few celebrities who are victims of this anxiety disorder.

OCD is a mental disorder found to be in almost 2% of Adults in US. This percentage of OCD sufferers gives the chance that a number of actors and other stars would be victims of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.
OCD has different levels of severity in different people. Sometimes it is seen in urge to wash hands, and sometimes these can be violent as well. Most of the OCD patients reported have been found to be due to a patient’s thoughts.

If someone most of the time thinks about germs, he will be tempted to clean his hands numerous times. If anyone thinks about keeping things in proper place, they might be inclined to examine the cupboards and their drawers again and again.

The main problem of suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is that the actions you perform are hindrance to your everyday life. Caring about germs and dirt is one thing while washing your hands again and again without reason is something that can be termed to as illness similar to other types of diseases.
The Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is not something quite negative and is commonly referred to as simple anxiety disorder and the treatment is carried out. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is only a hindrance in normal everyday life and you would not find OCD to be included in illnesses that are dangerous.

Celebrities have also been found to be a victim of OCD. Howie Mandel says that his success is a part of his OCD. He says that OCD allows him to be funny and without OCD he wouldn’t be like he is now.
The football star David Beckham has also been found to be facing issues with OCD. Howard Hughes from the Aviator has also been seen to suffer from severe obsession compulsion disorder.

A number of websites have reported Jessica Alba, Chalize Theron, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Alec Baldwin, and Billy Bob Thornton but they are working extremely fine. Most of the celebrities and stars use the illness as a part of their act and are quite successful in their life.

Finding an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Support Group

Searching for a support group for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is one of the most difficult tasks. This gets even more difficult if you are a patient who has been recently diagnosed to be having OCD issues or you don’t want others to know your condition and the thing that you are suffering from.

An Obsessive Compulsive Disorder support group may be an important part of treating the condition which you are suffering from. A data collected in the United States shows that about 22 million of the people in US suffer from disorders based on Anxiety Disorders.2-2.5 percent of these 22 million people are victims of the Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. There are a number of people suffering from this type of problems as well as other mental illnesses and you should not feel alone. You really need to find individuals that can help you to handle the problem and these people can be found with the help of OCD support groups.

Traditional and Online Support
Two types of distinct groups are available which help the people facing problems of obsessive compulsive disorder. First one of these groups is the traditional group that can be found in the community around you. Another support group can be found with the help of internet.
Both of the groups have been found to be functional and offer you unique features that you might need to handle your problems. Joining a traditional group usually found in communities gives you the edge of interaction with others socially and allows you to learn the ways to treat yourself and work with the people who are suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.Online support groups allow you to stay attached with the group and interact with members of group at any time during day and keep yourself ambiguous to a certain point. The best thing is to increase the speed of your treatment process which can be attained from joining both the groups which are available on internet and in communities.

Spiritual Groups
Apart from the online and community support groups, there are a number of support groups based on spiritual treatment processes.You can take the benefits of interacting with people, gain patient education, coping tactics and much more. It is important to know that spiritual groups don’t include medical education.
You should consider the types of groups that are available and then you should carefully select the one you’d be comfortable with.

How to cope with OCD Anxiety in the Workplace

If you have OCD, it would be an extremely challenging task to cope with the anxiety at your workplace. Each one of us must have experienced some sort of anxieties at any point in our lives. Anxiety is a normal and standard reaction to cope with stress in our lives.

However, for those suffering from OCD, anxiety is a totally different matter. This is because OCD is in itself an anxiety disorder. Anxiety for them is more complicated. In a workplace, this is particularly true.
If you are diagnosed with OCD, you are likely to have the knowledge of OCD and the symptoms that you experienced. It is vital to gain understanding on this disorder if you feel that you are lacking in knowledge. As previously stated, OCD is anxiety-based. It is often triggered by frequent but unwanted thoughts, which are known as “obsessions”

OCD sufferers might also experience a tendency towards repetitive behaviours. These are known as “compulsions”. Individuals having this condition are mostly involved in different sorts of habits or rituals.
Counting objects or cleaning in a certain manner repeatedly are two examples of OCD. If you are suffering from something like this, it might affect your memory and concentration at work resulting in poorer performance. You would find that your responsibility at work is being threatened by this obsessions and compulsions.

Ways to cope
To deal with OCD, the first strategy that you should consider is to seek professional help from a therapist or medical practitioners with expertise in OCD.

These experts will try to unlock the factors triggering your OCD by applying specific therapy method suitable to you.If you fear that the OCD is resulting in intense anxiety, and is affecting your work, it is very important to inform the Human Resources Department in your company. Your rights and welfare as an employee should not be affected. Besides, companies nowadays believe in supporting their employees to achieve ‘work-life’ balance.Your company will ensure to support you all the way, for instance making special arrangements, allowing flexibility to ensure you have proper treatment. Your work performance is what matters to them. They will do what is best to accommodate your needs as long as you maintain your quality of work.

Conclusions

From this guide, anxiety in the workplace can be overcome successfully if you know the ways. However, expect to encounter difficulties and challenges. It is not easy to deal with OCD especially when it crosses path with your work life. However, the important thing is that it is possible to cope with OCD when you are at work.Follow the treatment and advice by your therapist or medical professional. Be persistent and disciplined. Do not give up. Also, consult with your company so that they are aware of your condition and know that you are working on getting better. Do not be shy, talk with your friends and work mates. It is better to be in a working environment that is aware of your condition. You will feel better, and get better quickly if you have a healthy working environment around you.

Children and OCD

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) knows no boundaries. Anyone regardless of intellect, nationality, sexual orientation, gender, race and age are exposed to OCD. Not just adults, children can also suffer from it.
For example, this is a story of Ashley, a ten year old girl. She would join her friends to wash her hands every time after eating, and they enjoyed doing this.

However, Ashley was different from her friends because she was unable to resist washing her hands repeatedly once she started. She would end up washing, soaping and drying repeatedly until her hands were extremely dry, cracking and bleeding. She very much wanted to stop, but the thoughts of having germs all over her hands overpowered her to the extent that she did not realise she was injuring herself whilst trying to clean her hands.

Ashley’s parents might think that this habit was not serious, that maybe it was just a part of Ashley’s process of growing up and would just die away as she grew older. It did not cross their minds that Ashley was showing early signs of OCD since she was too young. What they did not know was that this bizarre obsession and compulsion with germs had started to take its toll on Ashley, taking most of her time and energy, resulting in delays with normal routines, affecting her concentrations at school and whilst playing with her friends. At school, she did not want to touch door knobs, took longer in toilets and refused to hold hands with her classmates and teachers. At home, she did not want to touch anything without cleaning or disinfecting it first. Her hands became extremely dry, cracking and itchy as she was using too much soap and using very warm water when cleaning her hands.

Ashley might just be one of many children suffering from OCD. It is the nature of children to be excited and curious of everything around them and to try repeating certain actions to respond to their observations and eagerness to learn and explore new things. Hence, it is not that straightforward to suggest and decide that certain habits become some sort of obsessions or compulsions.

What is OCD? It is a form of anxiety that happens when a person mentally fails to cope with worries and doubts. The factors causing this might be medical or clinical in nature, which should be addressed by taking medications. On the other hand, the factors might be psychological and should be treated appropriately.
Logically, it is much easier to treat children with OCD as their minds are still pure, not corrupted, like a sponge, easily absorb new knowledge and information, unlike adults who already have certain judgements, principles, beliefs and analyses.

Any child with OCD is best to undergo behaviour or psychological treatment. Although takes longer and involves more work and effort, it is more effective in contrasts with clinical treatment which often causes side effects. It is more reassuring to parents, knowing that their child would not depend on any medications.
It is highly recommended that children showing signs of OCD to be treated immediately, as it is very likely that the OCD would totally disappear. Parents should realise that by not doing anything, the OCD would develop as the child grows, which could escalate, becomes more difficult to control and finally occupy the child’s life, which in turn would affect his or her growth and well-being.

In conclusion, OCD is indeed a problem. However, it can be managed if detected early in your child. Consult the doctors immediately if you think that your child has OCD.

About Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) affects many people. Most probably we do not know that people with OCD suffer from it, and they might not even know that they have it too. They repeat certain habits or activities so many times, mostly because of the need to be perfect or because of fear.
How does someone have OCD? Genetics is one of the factor, some experts say. If a person has it, it is likely that his or her child or other immediate family members have it too, even though not in the same strain. For example, a person who has an OCD of fear of germs without explainable reasons, one of his or her member of family might not necessarily have the same fear but suffer other form of OCD, for instance the need to have things in a particular order all the time.

Firstly, OCD is about unexplained obsessions. Obsessions can be defined as thoughts or ideas repeatedly running through a person’s mind. Even though one might be aware of possessing bizarre habits and fears, one does not have the power to control and get rid of it. Some OCD sufferers might experience ‘obsessions’ once in a while, whilst others every second.

Secondly, OCD is about compulsions. Compulsions is defined as actions or behaviours one assumes to overcome the anxieties and fears of obsessions. Usually, these compulsions are based on certain predetermined rules, which then must be obeyed with extreme precisions and accuracies. Someone with OCD has high attention to details, particularly during an ‘attack’.

An OCD sufferer who is fear of germs would think that germs are all around, feeling the need to get rid of them all the time. Hence, he or she might wash hands or clean up repeatedly. This obsession takes over the mind again and again, triggering the compulsion to take repeated actions. He or she believed that carrying out the compulsions would relieve the anxieties caused by the obsessions, only to realise that it is just for a short time, as after a while the obsession resumes and often gets worse.

OCD occurs more than we actually thought. Some people take it lightly, assuming that it would just go away as time passes. Some even find it laughable, the bizarre behaviours and repetitions do appear funny sometimes. Everyone should realise, however, that OCD is indeed serious and needs to be addressed and treated straight away.

Medications such as drugs are often given to help control the thought processes of OCD sufferers. This, however, is a short time solution and can cause side effects. Sufferers often resumes to the old habits and obsessions after just a short while. Another more effective treatment used is through cognitive behavioural therapy. The OCD sufferers are managed, trained and compelled to take their own decisions to overcome the disorder. Although takes longer, it is known to be more effective.

OCD is very tricky, often not very visible or obvious until it becomes serious. Once this happens, people often end up locking themselves at home as it begins to affect their work and social lives, thus causing embarrassments. On the other hand, even though public awareness of OCD is important, at least it is not harmful enough to kill us. It can still be cured, and at the end of the day, that is what matters the most.

Dealing With Those Unwanted OCD Thoughts

When you begin to experience several unwanted intrusive thoughts, chances are you might be developing an OCD or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. In the medical realms, ADHD and Depression have a strong relation with OCD. Therefore having any of those will probably make you eventually develop an OCD as well.

However, OCD thoughts are not in any way related to a Bipolar Disorder; they’re completely different cases. The development of depression or OCD is highly related to the shifting of the level of the serotonin, a brain hormone responsible for transmitting nerve signals between nerve cells and would result to the narrowing of the blood vessels. Low levels of serotonin would result to changes in the temperament or mood of an individual. Another very common occurrence on depressed individuals is to develop OCD thoughts. Obsessive thoughts are typically uncomfortable and disturbing involving repulsive thoughts, even immoral and individuals who experience these often feels perverted and bad about themselves.

If a person is having a depression, his or her depression will produce obsessive thoughts like getting publicly humiliated. The common prescription to this kind of cases is doses of sleep inducing pills and drugs that rapidly increase serotonin levels.

You will be able to identify OCD thoughts through these characterizations:

1. OCD Thoughts differ from unwanted thoughts in a way that they interfere in the mind so suddenly and completely unintentional. They are very different from a regular preoccupation, where the person keeps on dwelling thoughts, although that they are very much already aware that the thoughts are unhealthy.

2. OCD thoughts cause considerable amount of distress to the individual having it. The recurring thoughts afflict the person’s mind malevolently and they would begin to feel imprisoned for not being able to get out from such a condition. Person experiencing these kinds of thoughts feel confused of being pleasured or guilty about the situation.

3. People having this struggle a lot to get it out of their minds, even to the extent of deliberately becoming elusive at situations or places that might trigger the thoughts again. They are in constant fear that things might go out of hand and there would be nothing they can do about it anymore and that they might commit something bad at the end.

4. OCD sufferers often feel deprived of hope in their present condition. As they are aware and conscious of their irrationality, the fact that they can’t do anything about no matter how much they want to get rid of it, remains true.

5. Obsessive thoughts likely defile an individual’s moral standards making him or her disgusted and evil about themselves. They would likely feel that they are religiously out casted for having been commencing such kinds of thoughts.

The best immediate way to deal with this is to generally comprehend that the entire situation is a mental process and that they mean absolutely nothing in real tangible terms. Understanding that there is not point of being guilty of the entire situation as they are not really happening in the real life. Moreover, being of aware in all of these will provide a sense of deterrence in every committing anything socially unacceptable.

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