Royce White Anxiety Disorder: Houston Rocket Suspended Amid Dispute Over …

Houston Rockets’ officials announced Sunday that the organization would be suspending rookie Royce White amid ongoing debate over how to best address his anxiety disorder and overall mental health during the NBA season.

According to the Mayo Clinic, White’s condition, identified as generalized anxiety disorder, is characterized by ongoing anxiety that interferes with day-to-day activities. It affects some 6.8 million American adults, or about 3.1 percent of people age 18 and over in a given year.

Though different from panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other types of anxiety, generalized anxiety disorder does share similar symptoms, including constant worrying or obsession about small or large concerns; restlessness and feeling keyed up or on edge; fatigue; difficulty concentrating or your mind “going blank;” irritability; muscle tension or muscle aches; trembling, feeling twitchy or being easily startled; trouble sleeping; sweating, nausea or diarrhea; and shortness of breath or rapid heartbeat, Mayo Clinic explains.

White’s suspension comes on the heels of rising concern about mental health among athletes and black men.

Mental health has a stigma that is tied into weakness and is absolutely the antithesis of what athletes want to portray,” Dr. Thelma Dye Holmes, executive director of the Northside Center for Child Development, told the New York Times last year.

Others say that similar stigmas are what’s keeping the issue from being addressed in the black community as well.

“Many African-Americans have a lot of negative feelings about, or not even aware of mental health services. They may not be aware of the symptoms of many mental disorders, or they may believe that to be mentally ill is a sign of weakness or a sign of a character fault,” said Dr. William Lawson, a professor and chairman of psychiatry at Howard University College of Medicine, in a discussion with NPR.

Overlap between the two groups — including the suicides of San Diego Chargers’ Junior Seau and the Kansas City Chiefs’ Jovan Belcher — have prompted officials to prioritize mental health screening among athletes. (Though some have questioned how effective the safety really is.)

White stopped participating in team activities in October, saying his mental health took precedence over his NBA career, the Associated Press reports.

“Just knowing what I know about anxiety and mental health, there is a side of my mind that can’t look away from the fact that I do think about it every day. I wake up (and think), ‘Am I cut out for this?'” White said in a phone interview with CNN, noting plans to roll out a campaign that raises awareness about mental illness and helps to destigmatize it.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety disorders are treatable, and the vast majority of people who suffer from them can be helped with professional care. Treatments include medications such as antidepressants and sedatives for short-term relief, and psychotherapy, which aims to tackle underlying life stresses and prompt behavior changes that may offer relief.

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

Related on HuffPost:

Which State Has The Most (And Least) Mental Illness?

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  • 51. Maryland

    The report shows 16.7 percent of Maryland residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 50. Pennsylvania

    The report shows 17.7 percent of Pennsylvania residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 49. North Dakota

    The report shows 18 percent of North Dakota residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 48. Florida

    The report shows 18.1 percent of Florida residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 47. Illinois

    The report shows 18.1 percent of Illinois residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 46. South Dakota

    The report shows 18.1 percent of South Dakota residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 45. New Jersey

    The report shows 18.3 percent of New Jersey residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 44. Virginia

    The report shows 18.5 percent of Virginia residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 43. Alaska

    The report shows 18.8 percent of Alaska residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 42. Arizona

    The report shows 18.8 percent of Arizona residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 41. South Carolina

    The report shows 18.9 percent of South Carolina residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 40. Iowa

    The report shows 19 percent of Iowa residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 39. New Mexico

    The report shows 19 percent of New Mexico residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 38. Minnesota

    The report shows 19.1 percent of Minnesota residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 37. Georgia

    The report shows 19.3 percent of Georgia residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 36. Hawaii

    The report shows 19.5 percent of Hawaii residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 35. Mississippi

    The report shows 19.5 percent of Mississippi residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 34. California

    The report shows 19.6 percent of California residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 33. Delaware

    The report shows 19.6 percent of Delaware residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 32. New Hampshire

    The report shows 19.6 percent of New Hampshire residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 31. North Carolina

    The report shows 19.6 percent of North Carolina residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 30. Texas

    The report shows 19.6 percent of Texas residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 29. Connecticut

    The report shows 19.7 percent of Connecticut residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 28. Louisiana

    The report shows 19.7 percent of Louisiana residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 27. Vermont

    The report shows 19.7 percent of Vermont residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 26. New York

    The report shows 19.9 percent of New York residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 25. Kentucky

    The report shows 20 percent of Kentucky residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 24. Massachusetts

    The report shows 20.2 percent of Massachusetts residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 23. Montana

    The report shows 20.2 percent of Montana residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 22. Alabama

    The report shows 20.3 percent of Alabama residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 21. Nebraska

    The report shows 20.4 percent of Nebraska residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 20. Ohio

    The report shows 20.4 percent of Ohio residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 19. Michigan

    The report shows 20.5 percent of Michigan residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 18. Kansas

    The report shows 20.6 percent of Kansas residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 17. Oregon

    The report shows 20.6 percent of Oregon residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 16. Colorado

    The report shows 20.8 percent of Colorado residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 15. Maine

    The report shows 20.9 percent of Maine residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 14. Missouri

    The report shows 20.9 percent of Missouri residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 13. Washington, D.C.

    The report shows 21 percent of Washington, D.C., residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 12. Washington

    The report shows 21.2 percent of Washington state residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 11. Wisconsin

    The report shows 21.2 percent of Wisconsin residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 10. Arkansas

    The report shows 21.3 percent of Arkansas residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 9. Tennessee

    The report shows 21.5 percent of Tennessee residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 8. Nevada

    The report shows 21.6 percent of Nevada residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 7. Oklahoma

    The report shows 21.6 percent of Oklahoma residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 6. Wyoming

    The report shows 21.8 percent of Wyoming residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 5. Indiana

    The report shows 22 percent of Indiana residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 4. West Virginia

    The report shows 22 percent of West Virginia residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 3. Idaho

    The report shows 22.5 percent of Idaho residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 2. Utah

    The report shows 24.1 percent of Utah residents experienced some form of mental illness.

  • 1. Rhode Island

    The report shows 24.2 percent of Rhode Island residents experienced some form of mental illness.

Rockets suspend F Royce White

HOUSTON (AP) — The Houston Rockets suspended first-round pick Royce White for ”refusing to provide services” required by his contract on Sunday.

General manager Daryl Morey said Sunday that the team will continue to work with White in hopes of finding a resolution.

White will not be paid during his suspension.

White refused his assignment to Houston’s D-League affiliate a week ago. The 16th overall pick in the June draft has spent most of the season on Houston’s inactive list while he and the team figure out how to handle his anxiety disorder and overall mental health.

White has been vocal on Twitter throughout this saga, and he continued to voice his opinions on the Web site after the announcement Sunday.

”What’s suspending me suppose to do. I’ve been away from the team for a month 1/2. Guess we want to give it a title to shift accountability,” he tweeted.

That was the first in a string of tweets on the subject, and he then addressed Morey in the second one.

”Threat, Fines, Suspension won’t deter me. I won’t accept illogical health decisions, I will keep asking for safety health. (hash)BeWell (at)dmorey,” he tweeted.

The Rockets chose White in the first round after a season at Iowa State, where he helped the Cyclones to their first NCAA tournament berth in seven years by leading the team in scoring (13.4 points a game), rebounds (9.3), assists (5.0), steals (1.2) and blocks (0.9).

The 6-foot-8 White missed the first week of training camp to work with the Rockets to create an arrangement to deal with his anxiety disorder within the demands of the NBA’s travel schedule. He and the team agreed to allow him to travel by bus to some games while he confronted his fear of flying and obsessive-compulsive disorder. He flew to Detroit with the team for the season opener and then traveled by bus to Atlanta and Memphis for games.

But he soon stopped participating in team activities and said on Twitter that dealing with his mental health took precedence over his NBA career. Then came his decision last Sunday to refuse his assignment to the D-League. Despite that decision, he said then that he still hopes to return to basketball in the future.

”And daily I’m just trying to stand up for my health and make sure that my health isn’t neglected in an operation where, me and you both know, it’s mostly about money,” White said in a recent interview with Sirius/XM Radio. ”And I’m kind of the only one that’s going to sit in the situation and say, ‘Hey, let’s put the health thing first.”’

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder affects 2.2-million Americans


Obsessive compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder. Approximately 2.2-million Americans are diagnosed with this disability, including a number of celebrities.

The disorder causes people to have unwanted and repeated thoughts- feelings and ideas that make them feel driven to do something.

Howie Mandel is one of the many celebrities with OCD. He says he has a fear of germs and will not shake hands with anyone. Instead, he will do a “fist bump”.

“OCD is real… I have a serious fear of germs and treatment helps me,” Mandel said in a recent public service announcement. “If you know someone with OCD, talk to a doctor or therapist.”

Mandel is not alone.

Actress Cameron Diaz is obsessive about cleaning doorknobs in her home, while Megan Fox has admitted her OCD has been a challenge. She has significant issues with public bathrooms and silverware in restaurants.

Award-winning actress Julianne Moore claims that her OCD helps with her roles when she plays dark and emotional characters. And Charlize Theron says she has to be incredibly tidy and organized. If not, it’s difficult for her to function.

Actor Billy Bob Thornton is compulsive about mathematics. Howard Stern wrote a book in 1995 about his OCD and the impact it had on his education and career.

Even Donald Trump says he has borderline OCD.

Since OCD affects people differently, there are many ways to treat the disorder.

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America shares tips: www.adaa.org

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(Court of Protection, Mostyn J, 11 December 2012)

By Samantha Bangham, Law Reporter

03 January 2013

(Court of Protection, Mostyn J, 11 December 2012)

The 57-year-old man suffered from a number of separable mental disorders including childhood autism, obsessive compulsive disorder, dissocial personality disorder, mixed anxiety disorder and paedophilia. The professional opinion was that he lacked capacity to litigate, to make decisions concerning his care needs including where he lived, the medication he should take, the contact he should have with others, and about his finances, property and affairs. It was agreed by all parties that it was in his best interests to remain living in his current care home indefinitely and that he should be subjected to rigorous restrictions on those he could have contact with and in his correspondence in order to minimise the risk he posed.

The man’s paedophilia manifested itself in compulsive letter writing about his fantasies about sex with children which he would leave in public places, collecting photos of children and other sexually deviant behaviour. From time to time it was judged necessary for him to be strip-searched, his correspondence monitored and his telephone conversations listened to.

There was no question that the man was being deprived of his liberty but Art 5 of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms 1950 permitted the lawful detention of persons with unsound mind and all parties were in agreement that his detention fell squarely within the exception. The more uncertain question was whether the man’s rights under Art 8 were being infringed.

In order to ensure compliance with Art 8 the Official Solicitor proposed a highly detailed agreed policy arrangement document which regulated inter alia the circumstances in which the man could be strip searched and have his telephone calls and correspondence monitored. The NHS Trust would agree to review each separate policy and the Care Quality Commission would seek advice from a human rights expert and specifically case track any material allegations of abuse made by the man.

Although not every case which involved some interference with Art 8 rights necessitated detailed policy documents such as this, in certain instances where there was going to be a long-term restrictive regime accompanied by invasive monitoring, the policies agreed here were likely to be necessary if serious doubts of a breach of Art 8 were to be avoided. In addition to the policy document there would be an annual review of the man’s circumstances by the court.

Yoga can tackle psychological disorders


Researchers at the Dev Sanskriti University here say that a holistic way involving yoga and herbal medicines can combat psychological disorders.

The researchers subjected 60 patients of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to a combination of yoga, pranayam, recitation of Gayatri Mantra and herbal medicines. The highly revered Gayatri Mantra is based on a Vedic Sanskrit verse from a hymn of the Rig Veda.

The 60 participants were equally divided into males and females. They got 45 individual sessions of therapeutic interventions of holistic approach. Each session was of 60 minutes, with patients doing pranayam and Gayatri Mantra for 10 minutes each and yoga for 20 minutes.

The most widely utilized treatments now are pharmacological management and behavior modification, said an article in the first issue of the Dev Sanskriti University’s Interdisciplinary International Journal.

A major disadvantage of drug treatment for anxiety disorders was that the relapse rate was very high, said researchers Deepak Singh, Pranav Pandya, O.P. Mishra and Pragya S. Lodhi.

Pandya is the chancellor of the universtiy. Mishra is the Emeritus Professor of psychology while Deepak Singh and Pragya Singh are
assistant professors in the department of psychology.

The ‘holistic approach produced significant reduction in the level of OCD’, said the research paper.

‘The combination of these specific techniques has collective effect on the patients and causes significant reduction in the symptoms of OCD,’ the university said.

‘Thus, the holistic approach can provide a new strategy for management of OCD. The findings are an important exploration with
wide scope for further research and applications,’ it said.

The paper also said some of the medicines in the market ‘cause many side effects’ and approximately 90 percent of patients suffer a relapse if they discontinue medication.

It said a new holistic approach was developed to provide maximum relief to the patients.

‘The holistic approach is based on the principle of psychology, yoga and ayurveda (besides Gayatri Mantra recitation),’ the journal said.

According to the researchers, the nature of psychological disorder ‘is very complex and it is very difficult to understand and diagnose psychological disorder until it manifests itself in behaviour.

OCD is a common and often chronic and disabling disorder, the paper said. It is said to be one of the least understood, least diagnosed, and most disabling of the anxiety disorders.

The worldwide prevalence of OCD is two percent of the general population. It usually begins in adolescence or in early adulthood.

Defeat psychological disorders with yoga


Researchers at the Dev Sanskriti University here say that a holistic way involving yoga and herbal medicines can combat psychological disorders.

The researchers subjected 60 patients of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) to a combination of yoga, pranayam, recitation of Gayatri Mantra

and herbal medicines. The highly revered Gayatri Mantra is based on a Vedic Sanskrit verse from a hymn of the Rig Veda.

The 60 participants were equally divided into males and females. They got 45 individual sessions of therapeutic interventions of holistic approach. Each session was of 60 minutes, with patients doing pranayam and Gayatri Mantra for 10 minutes each and yoga for 20 minutes.

The most widely utilized treatments now are pharmacological management and behavior modification, said an article in the first issue of the Dev Sanskriti University’s Interdisciplinary International Journal.

A major disadvantage of drug treatment for anxiety disorders was that the relapse rate was very high, said researchers Deepak Singh, Pranav Pandya, OP Mishra and Pragya S Lodhi.

Pandya is the chancellor of the universtiy. Mishra is the Emeritus Professor of psychology while Deepak Singh and Pragya Singh are assistant professors in the department of psychology. The “holistic approach produced significant reduction in the level of OCD”, said the research paper. “The combination of these specific techniques has collective effect on the patients and causes significant reduction in the symptoms of OCD,” the university said.

“Thus, the holistic approach can provide a new strategy for management of OCD. The findings are an important exploration with wide scope for further research and applications,” it said. The paper also said some of the medicines in the market “cause many side effects” and approximately 90 percent of patients suffer a relapse if they discontinue medication.

It said a new holistic approach was developed to provide maximum relief to the patients. “The holistic approach is based on the principle of psychology, yoga and ayurveda (besides Gayatri Mantra recitation),” the journal said.

According to the researchers, the nature of psychological disorder “is very complex and it is very difficult to understand and diagnose psychological disorder until it manifests itself in behaviour. OCD is a common and often chronic and disabling disorder, the paper said. It is said to be one of the least understood, least diagnosed, and most disabling of the anxiety disorders.

The worldwide prevalence of OCD is two percent of the general population. It usually begins in adolescence or in early adulthood.

People with mental disorders more vulnerable to domestic violence

People with mental health disorders, across all diagnoses, are more likely to have experienced domestic violence than the general population.
This is according to new research from King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the University of

Bristol.

Previous studies into the link between domestic violence and mental health problems have mainly focused on depression, but this is the first study to look at a wide range of mental health problems in both male and female victims.

In this study, researchers reviewed data from 41 studies worldwide. Compared to women without mental health problems, women with depressive disorders were around 2 and a ½ times more likely to have experienced domestic violence over their adult lifetime; women with anxiety disorders were over 3 and a ½ times more likely; and women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were around 7 times more likely.

Women with other disorders including obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), eating disorders, common mental health problems, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were also at an increased risk of domestic violence compared to women without mental health problems. Men with all types of mental disorders were also at an increased risk of domestic violence. However, prevalence estimates for men were lower than those for women, indicating that it is less common for men to be victims of repeated severe domestic violence.

“In this study, we found that both men and women with mental health problems are at an increased risk of domestic violence. The evidence suggests that there are two things happening: domestic violence can often lead to victims developing mental health problems, and people with mental health problems are more likely to experience domestic violence,” said Professor Louise Howard, senior author of the study from King’s Institute of Psychiatry.

This study is part of PROVIDE, a 5-year research programme on domestic violence funded by NIHR.

The finding has been published in PLOS ONE.

Intense Dreams May Lead to Heightened OCD Symptoms

Some people believe that dreams can predict the future. In the case of people suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder, that may be true – with a caveat. More intense dreams can predict exacerbated compulsions the next day.

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A study conducted by researchers at Hong Kong Shue Yan University examined the relationship between dreams and the reality of 594 individuals with obsessive compulsive disorder. The researchers found that certain types of dreams exacerbated symptoms and compulsions the following day, particularly dreams charged with feelings of anger, guilt, and shame. Researchers also found that dreams characterized by magical thinking, or thoughts of having a superpower or being able to control the behavior of others, also increased the symptoms of OCD.

According to Calvin Kai-Ching Yu, one of the study authors, unhappy dreams can cause the person to attempt to purify himself or herself when he or she wakes up the next morning. Feeling angry, ashamed, or guilty may prompt an individual to remove the negative feelings when they are awake. Because the anxiety may be exacerbated by these intensely negative dreams, it can cause an increased amount of compulsions.

This finding may also explain why many obsessions and compulsions begin during childhood. During adolescence, magical thinking is generally the strongest, usually because children’s level of imagination is so high. Unfortunately, Yu said in a statement, people with OCD grow up and become unable to distinguish between magical thinking and reality, prompting feelings of paranoia and other heightened anxiety.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a type of anxiety disorder marked by unwanted or repeated thoughts, feelings, ideas, and behaviors, which are also known as compulsions. Often the person has compulsions that he or she needs to act out in order to relieve the anxiety, but the tension relief is generally temporary. However, not acting out the compulsions can lead to great anxiety.


Published by Medicaldaily.com

Fudging the Facts, for Peace of Mind

Zadie.Courtesy of Harley A. Rotbart, M.D. Zadie.

Lou, my beloved grandfather, lived almost 101 years and obsessively worried every single day of his adult life — probably because his adult life began before it should have. As a child in Russia, he watched helplessly as his mother and sister were killed during a vicious pogrom in their village.

Lou (I called him Zadie) made his way to America, and immediately began imagining the worst about his fate, and his family’s fate, in his new country. I believe Zadie lived as long as he did because he was afraid of what would happen to his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren if he wasn’t here to protect them.

When I was a third-year medical student in New York City, he called from Denver very early one morning, waking me and my roommates. He had been listening to his transistor radio on one of his many sleepless nights of worry, and had heard that a Staten Island Ferry boat had crashed, injuring numerous passengers.

There were more than seven million people in the city, and Zadie called at 4 a.m. to make sure I wasn’t one of those injured. It was from him we learned the importance of telling white lies and omitting certain truths with our elderly parents and grandparents.

Before accusing me of infantilizing and patronizing my older family members, hear me out. Anxiety disorders can be debilitating for the elderly. A comprehensive review of the subject found 10 to14 percent of those 65 and older meet the criteria for these diagnoses, a significantly higher figure than for the more widely recognized depression syndromes in the same demographic.

Indeed, depression and anxiety disorders often occur together. Anxiety disorders are underdiagnosed in the elderly, largely because the symptoms are often assumed to be just another manifestation of aging. Additionally, the clinical assessment of the elderly for anxiety is more complicated than for younger patients because the signs may differ from those classically described in the diagnostic manuals.

A large national study showed an increased incidence of general anxiety disorder beginning after age 55, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness notes that, like depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder tends to worsen in old age. Factors contributing to the prevalence and severity of anxiety disorders in the elderly include a host of concomitant medical problems that interact with anxiety in a complicated way.

From the review article cited earlier:

The co-morbidity between medical illness and anxiety disorders poses difficulties for…diagnosis and detection of anxiety. Researchers have suggested that older adults may be more likely to attribute physical symptoms related to anxiety to medical issues… In turn, many physical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, hyperthyroidism, and pulmonary and vestibular difficulties, can mimic the symptoms of anxiety…making it difficult to establish the underlying cause…

Furthermore, the symptoms that result from medical illnesses may produce fearful bodily sensations that may result in the subsequent development of anxiety disorders.

As an example, more than 40 percent of patients with Parkinson’s disease meet the criteria for an anxiety disorder. Dementia is also associated with anxiety in a bidirectional way — anxiety can accelerate cognitive decline, which in turn can increase symptoms of anxiety. Added to this morass are the side effects, which can include anxiety, of many medications taken by older patients.

The elderly clearly are an at-risk population for anxiety disorders. Which brings us back to white lies. Zadie’s well-earned anxieties, obsessions and worries accelerated greatly as he got older, and we realized they could largely be prevented if we simply didn’t share the complete truth with him all the time. This became known in our family as the Zadie Filter.

When we took our children to the mountains, we told him we were headed to Colorado Springs; he’d been to Colorado Springs many times and knew it was a flat highway drive from Denver. No high mountain passes or narrow roads without guardrails.

When he begged my sons to become doctors so they would serve behind the front lines in the event they were drafted (this was long after the military draft ended, which was still not reassuring enough for Zadie), they so promised. When our daughter started driving, Zadie warned her it wasn’t safe for a girl to drive alone in case she had car trouble; she promised she would always have company in the car.

Zadie died when his great-grandchildren were still teenagers, and so he never had to know that the boys didn’t go into medicine and that his great-granddaughter drives alone.

My mother, Zadie’s daughter, inherited his anxieties, and as she has entered her mid-80s her symptoms have also markedly increased. On the other side of the family, my mother-in-law’s issues with anxiety began with her Parkinson’s disease and have worsened as her neurological condition has progressed.

With our mothers, we also rely on the Zadie Filter. Our white lies and omissions reduce their worries — which is not to say we can protect them from all triggers (they still read the newspaper and watch the nightly news), but even a bit of relief for them is relief for us as well.

Our parents live for the most part on fixed incomes, so when we’re able to cover some of their expenses without their knowing, we do so, and they worry a little less about their bills. All it takes is a little white lie: “The apartment manager waived your heating bill this month because you’ve been such a good long-term tenant,” or, “Of course I used your credit card when I paid for your medicines.”

My mother accidentally found out that our son broke his finger (playing flag football during finals week!) when a well-intentioned friend asked her how her grandson was doing after his injury. She was upset we hadn’t told her — but only for a few moments, until we explained that it had happened a week before, that he was all splinted up and was in no pain. All of which was 100 percent true, and she didn’t lose a minute of sleep worrying about it.

Last week, after pressing our law student son (he of the broken finger) about a school transcript issue I’ve been worried about for him, he assured me it had been taken care of. Our daughter in grad school goes into bars only when she’s with a large group of friends, and our college son is the designated driver for all of his fraternity functions.

And so it begins.


Dr. Harley A. Rotbart is professor and vice chairman of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the author of “No Regrets Parenting.”

Shame and Anger Are Common Dream Themes for Obsessive Compulsive

December 14th, 2012

 
 
 
 

01-Therapy-News-Banner-03Research on obsessive-compulsive (OCD) tendencies has suggested that anxiety is prevalent in most cases. Anxiety-related stress is at the root of the majority of compulsions, and individuals with OCD engage in ritualistic behaviors in an effort to alleviate feelings of anxiety derived from obsessive thoughts, visions, or emotions. Additionally, anger, shame, and magical ideations propel anxious emotions and drive compulsive behaviors in OCD. Although magical ideas are markers for schizotypal issues and not OCD, they may still play a significant role in the manifestation of symptoms.

Calvin Kai-Ching Yu of the Department of Counseling and Psychology at Hong Kong Shue Yan University recently led a study that explored how these factors influenced OCD in a sample of 594 individuals. He also looked at dream experiences and how emotional valence during dream states affected waking behaviors and symptoms of OCD. “The overall findings substantiate the notion that individuals with high obsessive-compulsive distress tend to dream certain themes more frequently,” Yu said. In fact, he found that the individuals who experienced dreams that had strong emotional messages, those that were charged with feelings of guilt, shame, and anger, had increased waking compulsive behavior. Additionally, magical thinking, believing that one had super powers or could control other people or things, also elevated OCD symptoms. Yu believes that dreams that are filled with malevolent content can prompt people to try to purify themselves during waking hours. Individuals who feel especially guilty, angry, or shameful about imaginary things may become obsessed with finding ways to remove their negative feelings while they are awake. The conscious level of anxiety they feel during the day, caused by obsessive magical thoughts and negatively toned dreams, can lead to increased compulsions.

Yu theorizes that most of these obsessions are first developed in childhood, when imagination knows no limits. As individuals with OCD mature, they are unable to distinguish between magical thinking and reality when it comes to emotions and behaviors. Feelings of paranoia and other heightened states of anxiety resulting from magical thoughts and unrealistic dreams consume these individuals during their waking hours, making the sole mission of their lives to achieve a state of harmony, absent of anxiety, guilt, anger, or fear. Yu hopes that these most recent findings draw more attention to the way dreams, especially those of anger, affect anxious feelings in individuals with OCD.

Reference:
Kai-Ching Yu, C. (2012). Obsessive-compulsive distress and its dynamic associations with schizotypy, borderline personality, and dreaming. Dreaming. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/a0030791

© Copyright 2012 by www.GoodTherapy.org Concord Bureau – All Rights Reserved.

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The agony of OCD

Alarmingly, left to its own devices, OCD can escalate to the point where sufferers think that the most minor thought, action or act of negligence may cause mayhem to themselves or others. This, in turn, induces ritualistic behaviour. “One person I treated was getting up at two in the morning to do all the cleaning rituals before packing up his car with his TV, iron, microwave – anything that plugged in – so he knew it wasn’t left on at home, then driving to work several times in order to finally get there around 9am,” says Simon.