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HealthWatch: Anxiety is Treatable! – WEAREGREENBAY

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Ivanhoe Newswire) — Forty million adults suffer from anxiety disorders; yet, only a small percentage seek professional help. It is highly treatable…so, why do so many continue to suffer? 
Monica Reveley is finally loving life after being haunted for years by anxious and unwanted thoughts. 
“The violent intrusive thoughts…the sexual intrusive thoughts, especially. They were really uncomfortable, you know. You’re not supposed to have those kinds of thoughts. On the outside, I was straight A, involved in all the clubs, had all the friends. But on the inside, I was really miserable,” explained Monica. 
If an anxiety lasts for two weeks or longer, depression may be right around the corner. And that combination is not something you can think your way out of. 
Harry A. Croft, MD, Psychiatrist, says, “Despite your efforts at self-talk and whatever else you do, you can’t get rid of it.”
Prescriptions like Xanax and Klonopin help, but…  
Dr. Croft continues, “Far and away, the best treatments for anxiety disorders are therapies like cognitive behavioral therapy or desensitization therapy.”
Cognitive behavioral therapy  that means facing anxieties head on. 
“It’s like the bear. The bear comes to get us and how do we respond? We respond with rapid heartbeat and all these other things. It’s simply a way to help us get away from the bear…to stay alive. I’m a big believer that if you change the thought, the feeling will follow. So, I put a lot of emphasis on again the cognitive part of it,” Randy Pollock, MA, Licensed Counselor, told Ivanhoe.
If it’s been two weeks or more and anxiety is still tormenting you, here are a few quick tips: 
Avoid caffeine which amps you up even more, exercise will help drain away anxiety, and every day, breathe deeply.
“I wish that a lot of people had a lot more awareness about mental illnesses, so that people could be more open about it,” Monica shared. 
Alleviating stress and addressing any childhood trauma with a professional can go a long way toward keeping anxiety at bay.
Contributors to this news report include: Donna Parker, Producer; Bob Walko, Editor and Gary Boyer, Videographer.

ANXIETY IS TREATABLE!
REPORT #2522

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the United States, affecting 40 million adults age 18 and older every year. Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only 36.9 percent of those suffering receive treatment. People with an anxiety disorder are three to five times more likely to go to the doctor and six times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric disorders than those who do not suffer. Anxiety disorders develop from a complex set of risk factors, including genetics, brain chemistry, personality, and life events. It’s not uncommon for someone with an anxiety disorder to also suffer from depression. Nearly one-half of those diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Many people with an anxiety disorder also have a co-occurring disorder or physical illness, which can make their symptoms worse and recovery more difficult. It’s essential to be treated for both disorders. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are closely related to anxiety disorders, which some may experience at the same time, along with depression.
(Source: https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics#) 

CURRENT TREATMENTS: Depression and anxiety disorders can often be treated similarly. In many cases, therapy can be tailored to an individual so that it works to reduce the symptoms of both disorders. Several forms of psychotherapy are effective. Of these, cognitive behavioral therapy works to replace negative and unproductive thought patterns with more realistic and useful ones. Treatment often involves facing one’s fears as part of the pathway to recovery. Interpersonal therapy and problem-solving therapy are also effective, as well as prescribed medications. Symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders often occur together, and research shows that both respond to treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) medications. For people with severe symptoms, or functional limitations, psychotherapy and medication treatment may be combined. More than one in 10 Americans take antidepressants, the number one type of medication used by people ages 18 to 44. Joining a support group is always encouraged along with trying relaxation techniques, meditation, and breathing exercises. 
(Source: https://adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/depression/treatment#) 

RESEARCH BREAKTHROUGH FOR MENTAL HEALTH: Pioneered by researchers at Monash University in Australia, a promising new “whole person” approach to the treatment of anxiety and depression has been developed in an effort to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of current treatments, and further improve the lives of those who are living with these mental health disorders. Following the discovery of considerable genetic, neurological, developmental, behavioral and cognitive data, which suggested commonalities across anxiety and related disorders, transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral therapy interventions have been developed to form a new approach to treatment. This new disorder-independent approach considers the biological, physical and psychological symptoms, targeting the person and their emotional difficulties as a whole to deliver tailored treatment. “As well as providing better treatment for those experiencing anxiety and other emotional disorders, transdiagnostic treatments offer a number of appealing advantages to the mental health field,” shared Professor Peter Norton, Director of Translational Research at the Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences. The FEAR Clinic, housed within the Monash Psychology Centre, is adopting the transdiagnostic approach, so those who attend are first in line to benefit from this new ground-breaking approach to treatment.
(Source: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-03-breakthrough-anxiety-depression.html) 

? For More Information, Contact:

Harry A. Croft, MD                        Randy Pollock, MA
    hacmd@aol.com      xphobic@sbcglobal.net     
(210) 602-9418                        (210) 558-8200

Free weekly e-mail on Medical Breakthroughs from Ivanhoe. To sign up: http://www.ivanhoe.com/ftk
 

How Much Watching Time Do You Have This Weekend?

No matter how much free time you have this weekend, we have TV recommendations for you. Come back every Friday for new suggestions from our TV critic on what to watch.

This Weekend I Have … an Hour, and Anything Goes

‘Live From Lincoln Center: Sutton Foster in Concert
When to watch: Friday, 9 p.m., on PBS. (Check local listings.)

“Younger” doesn’t come back until June, but luckily there’s this terrific special to keep its star, Sutton Foster, in our minds and hearts this spring. In this special, she is by turns perky and salty and wistful. The highlight is the goofy, almost variety-show schtick between Ms. Foster and Jonathan Groff, which eventually leads to a fantastic tap duet to the song “Fit as a Fiddle (and Ready for Love).”

… a Few Hours, and I Like the Human Condition

This two-season series, which began in 2009, is for obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders what “Intervention” is for addiction: a frank, intimate, sometimes shocking snapshot of a person in crisis. Here, though, we also stay with the subjects through effective therapy and coaching. Pop culture tends to position O.C.D. as cutesy germaphobia, but “Obsessed” makes it clear that the disorder is isolating and debilitating — and, mercifully, also treatable.

… 4 Hours, and I Like Gentle Comedy

The brainy and self-effacing British comedian James Acaster released four stand-up specials at once: three individual chapters and a fourth that synthesizes material from the previous three. The wrinkled backdrops and Mr. Acaster’s unassuming demeanor give off a laid-back vibe, but the material is precisely written and tightly constructed, with elegant moments of poetry and fantasy. The third hour, “Reset,” is the best of the bunch, but the episodes build on one another and should be watched in order.

Niall Horan Said He Has "Mild" Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Niall Horan has previously shared how anxiety and mental health issues have been a factor in his on-stage performances. In 2017, the former One Direction member said he gets “a little anxious,” and in a new interview he said that he has been diagnosed with another form of mental illness — obsessive compulsive disorder.

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is estimated to affect 2.2 million people in the United States, and as the Anxiety and Depression Association of America explains, the disorder can cause a person to experience unwanted compulsions and obsessions, ranging from behavior to thoughts. As pointed out by Just Jared Jr., Niall explained in an interview with German magazine ZEIT LEO that doctors call his OCD “mild.”

The performer explained how his OCD causes “tics,” or the need to complete behaviors in a particular way. “I feel like I have to do things in a certain way,” he said in the interview. “For example, if I have a burger with chips on my plate, I always have to eat the chips first and only pick up the burger at the very end.” Niall went on to share how OCD has impacted his performance.

“There are other tics in my life. Even when I go on stage, I only have one fixed sequence. I always have to sing in the same order, move and so on,” he said.

He also previously explained that he practices a breathing technique before he goes on stage to cope with anxiety. It’s called”box breathing,” which is process where you take a deep breath in for four seconds, breathe out for four seconds, and then hold your breath for four seconds, and repeat as necessary.

Niall said he’s learned to not be ashamed of his tics, and he shouldn’t be. Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of, just as someone with a physical illness shouldn’t be ashamed.

“I live with them and they’re mine no matter what others think about it,” he said. “I’m just like — what the hell! Fortunately, I now have enough people around me who understand me.”

As mental health experts have previously explained, there are many people with OCD out there, and you’re not alone in this mental health struggle. Niall’s opening up about his OCD proves that. There are ways to treat and cope with the disorder, and you can always reach out to a trusted adult for help on finding what may work for you.

Related: Stress, Obsess, Repeat: What It’s Like to Have OCD

Check this out:

News Roundup: For Some People, Election 2016 Brought Out …

The Standard’s news roundup gives you a quick hit of interesting, sometimes irreverent, and breaking news stories from all over the state.

In a new study, Texas researchers say they have found that the 2016 presidential election triggered obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms in some people.

Dr. Eric Storch, vice chair of psychology at Baylor College of Medicine says he first started wondering about the election’s impact over a year ago when he held a training session.

“During the course of the day where this group of about five or six individuals, we just took a break to grab coffee, go to the restroom… and instead of doing that, everyone pulled out their phone and started checking the news,” Storch says.

Storch commented on this and found that regardless of political affiliation, people were trying to find out if anything had happened within the last few hours. And he says people kept checking the news throughout the day.

“So that people who might ordinarily check into the news for a few minutes at the end of the day were now in a somewhat compulsive fashion taking a lot of time to look at what’s happening on the political scene,” he says.

That prompted Storch and his colleagues to come up with a survey to try to measure this behavior. One of those colleagues is research coordinator, Sandra Cepeda.

“So we put together some measures that the behaviors seem to mirror,” Cepeda says. “So a lot of it looks like, kind of OCD symptoms, also anxiety, depression, a lot of people have concerns about worries related to the future of the country.”

Storch and Cepeda collected data from almost 500 survey participants over the course of four weeks. And while, they don’t think they’ve discovered a new disorder…they do think it’s unique from obsessive compulsive disorder.

“In some cases it really was impacting their day,” Storch says. “So that they might spend 1 or 2 hours a day checking news where they didn’t really want to, and the quality of the checking was actually one motivated by distress as opposed to someone who is interested in what’s happening in an intrinsic fashion.”

Storch adds 18 percent of the survey respondents were experiencing highly politically-focused intrusive thoughts and associated ritualistic behaviors.

And it didn’t matter if the participant was a Democrat or Republican.

This study was published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders.




The National Assessment of Educational Progress finds students in major Texas cities aren’t making gains in reading and math.

Houston Public Media’s Laura Isensee reports.

Houston is mostly following the national trend with basically flat scores. Houston’s 4th and 8th graders didn’t show any significant progress in either reading or math. And in Austin results were similar. In Dallas, 4th graders posted lower results in math.”

This national report card was released Tuesday and is produced by the U.S. Department of Education.




Austin is the best place to live in the country, according to the U.S. News and World Report. But other Texas cities weren’t too far behind. San Antonio ranked 14th on the list of 125 cities. The Dallas-Fort Worth area was 18th.  And even though Houston didn’t make the top 20, it was close behind at 26th.

Does higher severity really correlate with a worse quality of life in obsessive–compulsive disorder? A meta-regression

Back to Journals » Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment » Volume 14

This Founder Couldn’t Find A Resource For Her Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, So She Created One

Solome Tibebu’s journey to becoming a leader in healthcare innovation, award-winning social entrepreneur, and advocate for mental health and diversity began with a blog: while still in high school, Tibebu found had been experiencing severe panic attacks and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Through various therapists, medications, and psychoeducation, she finally learned how to best manage her symptoms. She was, however, dismayed by the lack of online resources or community of other youth going through something similar – which ultimately left her feeling isolated and misunderstood. So she decided to do something to change that, starting AnxietyInTeens.org and equipping young adults worldwide with tools and community to advance emotional wellness.

Solome Tibebu started Anxiety In Teens after her personal experience with the mental health challenge

I sat down with Tibebu to learn more about her story and what she’s learned:

Bruneau: Let’s hear more about how you came up with AnxietyInTeens.org.

Tibebu: I was the type of teen who would head to the local Barnes Noble after school to devour as much information about anxiety and OCD as I could. The more knowledge I gained about my conditions, the more powerful I felt. I believed it was critical that more youth would have access to this sort of psycho-education everywhere. As I set out to build Anxiety In Teens, I was empowered that I could put this energy to good use. This process of writing and creating still informs the expressive writing programs we do today.

Later, as an adult, I would get seasons of OCD come back into my life, which baffled me at first. I realized even I was disillusioned into thinking that this was just a teenage phase.  It is, in fact, something that I will need to manage for the rest of my life . As I consider my mental health journey and acknowledge how it continues to evolve, I stay engaged with the shifts in our audience’s wants and needs, too. I’m better equipped to hear and understand their plights, because it is mine, too.

Bruneau: How do mental health challenges make entrepreneurship challenging?

Tibebu: We often hear that the entrepreneurial path offers extreme highs and lows, exasperating an already frustrating situation for someone struggling with mental illness. We’re also told that we are somehow supposed to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps, not only in the business sense but emotionally, as well.  Practically speaking, one can’t simply avoid symptoms of a mental health disorder for too long . They change your plans, no matter what background you come from or how much you planned to accomplish. Sooner or later, it will impact your business, relationships and more.

My mental health experience has placed barriers between me and my peers and network in some sense, yet brought me together with others as well. It has required me to prioritize and consider what matters most more than ever. It has forced me to consider who I bring into my life and organization and how I communicate personally and professionally.

Bruneau: How have you built psychological resilience in the face of anxiety and OCD?

Tibebu: In the midst of some of my most challenging mental health lows, I recall intense impatience with my symptoms. “How totally inconvenient for this to be happening right now!” I thought, to say the least. Fortunately, with a kind, supportive and specialized mental health care provider and a renewed desire to put myself first, I started implementing the same evidence-based strategies that worked for me early on. This included regularly doing the assigned homework from my clinician, getting enough sleep, regular exercise including long runs, practicing mindfulness through various daily exercises and yoga, and practicing self-compassion.

Bruneau: How have your experiences with anxiety and OCD lent to your success? 

Tibebu: My experience has allowed me to embody a much greater capacity for compassion for myself and others. It has allowed me to develop the skills to manage disruptive emotions and develop a sense of equanimity in the face of busyness and uncertainty. It has brought me closer to individuals and families from all walks of life across the country, whose stories and journeys I would never have otherwise heard or known about. I’ve been very fortunate to access the resources and opportunities I have thus far, and I’m very hopeful to see what growing body of individuals and organizations there is who want to advance access and innovation in mental health-care.

Bruneau: What advice would you give someone going through what you went through, entrepreneur or not? 

Tibebu: Don’t suffer in silence . You are absolutely not alone in what you are going through, and mental illness is treatable and manageable . Odds are, one of the four closest people in your circle have also experienced some sort of mental health issue in their lifetime. Some of your closest family or friends may not understand what you’re going through, but they don’t necessarily need to right now. So long as you can get the help you need and put your health first, that is what matters.

Bruneau: What’s a favorite quote or advice you received that captures your mindset today?

Tibebu: “It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences.” – Audre Lorde

5 Ways Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Can Have Deadly Consequences

Sara and Amanda Eldritch

Authorities believe Sara and Amanda Eldritch, both 33 years old, were involved in a suicide pact that lead to their deaths.
Image source: YouTube/The Doctors

The recent death of two twin sisters who had battled obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) their entire lives has cast a spotlight on the challenges of living with the illness.

Sara and Amanda Eldritch, both 33 years old, of Broomfield, Colorado, were found fatally shot in a vehicle parked at a rest area at Royal Gorge Bridge and Park.

According to police, their deaths were believed to be the result of a suicide pact.

The twins’ OCD was so severe that at times they would rarely leave their house. Both also previously shared stories about taking 10-hour showers and using entire bars of soap to get clean.

They would go through bottles of rubbing alcohol and hydrogen peroxide to disinfect their skin.

If the two wanted to leave the house, they would stop eating and drinking hours in advance, so they could avoid public restrooms.

“It’s like listening to someone who’s holding you at gunpoint,” Amanda Eldritch told 9 News. “You absolutely have to do what they say.”

That description is, perhaps, the defining and most distressing element of OCD.

“It is incredibly debilitating,” Eric Storch, a professor of psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, speaking on behalf of the International OCD Foundation, told Healthline.

“So, if you could imagine going through life where every day you lost an hour to three hours to things you knew made no sense, but you couldn’t help but do them because you are deathly afraid of a feared outcome and you went day in and day out doing that, knowing you were ritualizing your life away,” he explained.

More than just obsession

Indeed, the Eldritch sisters’ deaths are a reminder that mental illness is rarely what we expect it to be.

OCD is defined by repetitive thoughts and actions that either cannot be controlled or can only be controlled for a short period of time.

Actions, known as rituals, are performed habitually due to some kind of trigger. Fear of germs and persistent handwashing is an obvious example.

Obsessions are intrusive thoughts that could include sexual images and desires, harm, and moral rightness. These thoughts often continue to persist despite the individual’s attempts to confront them.

“The general idea is that there is some trigger that takes place, it makes the person anxious, the person then does something to try and get rid of their anxiety like a ritual,” said Storch. “They temporarily succeed, but that temporary success actually rewards them and makes them more likely to do the same thing the next time it happens.”

“The more severe someone is, which often coincides with not responding to intervention, the more likely they are to start thinking about suicidality.” – Eric Storch, Baylor College on behalf of the International OCD Foundation

Five ailments that can emerge from OCD

Because of the impairment that OCD can have on someone’s life, the disorder has numerous associated conditions.

“The rule rather than exception is that a person with OCD has other co-morbid problems going on. Some of the most common ones include depression. Other anxiety conditions can be quite common. Then, you see a variety of other features that come into play,” said Storch.

The following are five serious symptoms and conditions common among people with OCD:

Body dysmorphic disorder

Body dysmorphic disorder is characterized by the persistent thought that one’s body is flawed or ugly.

These negative thoughts, like OCD, can cause severe emotional distress and problems in daily functioning.

The disorder is also often characterized by certain repetitive behaviors similar to OCD, including skin picking, excessive grooming, and excessive exercising.

Hoarding disorder

Hoarding disorder is a condition that is also closely associated with OCD.

This is where an individual is incapable of or has a persistent difficulty in discarding possessions.

The disorder is characterized by anxiety related to possession. The individual may not want to get rid of their possessions, but they may also be embarrassed by them.

As the hoarding becomes more serious, daily life impairments can occur.

These include loss of physical space, social problems, and even health hazards due to unsafe sanitary conditions.

Relationship problems

The co-occurrence of OCD and social anxiety can also affect an individual’s relationships, including dating and marriage.

So-called “relationship OCD” is characterized by persistent thoughts of doubt about one’s partner.

These can be related to levels of attraction and questions of worthiness of being with a certain individual.

These kinds of persistent thoughts have the capacity to harm a relationship, if untreated.

Depression

Awareness of one’s OCD and time spent “trapped” in certain behaviors and rituals can lead to a perceptible decline in quality of life, which can lead to depression.

“That’s one of the reasons you see such a high incidence of depression with OCD because it disrupts their life in such a significant fashion. A lot of times it will impair relationships or ability to work effectively or go to school,” said Storch.

Risk of suicide

Suicidal thoughts are also more common among those living with OCD.

“It can become so debilitating that people think that death may be their only salvation, their only escape from the distress,” said Storch.

“We tend to see that as severity increases. The more severe someone is, which often coincides with not responding to intervention, the more likely they are to start thinking about suicidality,” he added.

Effective treatments

There are effective treatments for OCD.

These include cognitive behavioral therapy and antidepressant medication.

According to Storch, about 85 percent of patients respond to these therapies or a combination of both.

“We really have a very good chance of a very successful outcome,” said Storch.

News Roundup: For Some People, Election 2016 Brought Out Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms, Study Finds

The Standard’s news roundup gives you a quick hit of interesting, sometimes irreverent, and breaking news stories from all over the state.

In a new study, Texas researchers say they have found that the 2016 presidential election triggered obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms in some people.

Dr. Eric Storch, vice chair of psychology at Baylor College of Medicine says he first started wondering about the election’s impact over a year ago when he held a training session.

“During the course of the day where this group of about five or six individuals, we just took a break to grab coffee, go to the restroom… and instead of doing that, everyone pulled out their phone and started checking the news,” Storch says.

Storch commented on this and found that regardless of political affiliation, people were trying to find out if anything had happened within the last few hours. And he says people kept checking the news throughout the day.

“So that people who might ordinarily check into the news for a few minutes at the end of the day were now in a somewhat compulsive fashion taking a lot of time to look at what’s happening on the political scene,” he says.

That prompted Storch and his colleagues to come up with a survey to try to measure this behavior. One of those colleagues is research coordinator, Sandra Cepeda.

“So we put together some measures that the behaviors seem to mirror,” Cepeda says. “So a lot of it looks like, kind of OCD symptoms, also anxiety, depression, a lot of people have concerns about worries related to the future of the country.”

Storch and Cepeda collected data from almost 500 survey participants over the course of four weeks. And while, they don’t think they’ve discovered a new disorder…they do think it’s unique from obsessive compulsive disorder.

“In some cases it really was impacting their day,” Storch says. “So that they might spend 1 or 2 hours a day checking news where they didn’t really want to, and the quality of the checking was actually one motivated by distress as opposed to someone who is interested in what’s happening in an intrinsic fashion.”

Storch adds 18 percent of the survey respondents were experiencing highly politically-focused intrusive thoughts and associated ritualistic behaviors.

And it didn’t matter if the participant was a Democrat or Republican.

This study was published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders.




The National Assessment of Educational Progress finds students in major Texas cities aren’t making gains in reading and math.

Houston Public Media’s Laura Isensee reports.

Houston is mostly following the national trend with basically flat scores. Houston’s 4th and 8th graders didn’t show any significant progress in either reading or math. And in Austin results were similar. In Dallas, 4th graders posted lower results in math.”

This national report card was released Tuesday and is produced by the U.S. Department of Education.




Austin is the best place to live in the country, according to the U.S. News and World Report. But other Texas cities weren’t too far behind. San Antonio ranked 14th on the list of 125 cities. The Dallas-Fort Worth area was 18th.  And even though Houston didn’t make the top 20, it was close behind at 26th.

Antidepressants in pregnancy raise depression risk in newborn

The mango season is here, and people are having their fill of the mango fruit. Mango has been known in India since very early times.

 

There are over 1,000 different varieties of mangos. Most of the cultivated varieties have arisen from four main species – Mangifera indica, Mangifera sylvatica, Mangifera odorata, and Mangifera zeylanica.

 

Mango cultivation is found in many countries of Southeast Asia – the Philippines, Indonesia, Java, Thailand, Burma, Malaysia and Sri Lanka. Introduction of the mango to East and West Africa and subsequently to Brazil is said to have occurred in the sixteenth century.

 

Mexico acquired the mango in the 19th Century, and it entered Florida, United State of America (U.S.A) in 1833. The cultivated mango varieties are the result of constant selection by man from original wild plants for over 4000 years. The wild progenies are still available in India in two species, Mangifera indica and Mangifera sylvatica, which have small fruits with a big seed, thin acidic flesh and long fibers.

 

Mango trees can grow up to 35 to 40 meters tall. The trees are long-lived, as some species still produce fruit after 300 years. In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of six meters (20 ft.), with profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots; the tree also sends down many anchor roots, which penetrate several feet of soil. The leaves are evergreen. When the leaves are young they are orange-pink, rapidly changing to a dark, glossy red, then dark green as they mature. The fruit takes three to six months to ripen.

 

There are over 1,000 different varieties of mangos, many of which ripen in summer. It is said that mangos are eaten fresh than any other fruit in the world. Below are some of the health benefits of Mango

 

 

Prevents cancer
Research has shown antioxidant compounds in mango fruit have been found to protect against colon, breast, leukemia and prostate cancers.

 

These compounds include quercetin, isoquercitrin, astragalin, fisetin, gallic acid and methylgallat, as well as the abundant enzymes.
Lowers cholesterol

 

The high levels of fiber, pectin and vitamin C in Mango help to lower serum cholesterol levels, specifically Low-Density Lipoprotein, referred to as bad cholesterol.

Promotes eye health

One cup of sliced mangoes supplies 25 per cent of the needed daily value of vitamin A, which promotes good eyesight and prevents night blindness and dry eyes.

Alkalizes the whole body
The tartaric acid, malic acid, and a trace of citric acid found in the fruit help to maintain the alkali reserve of the body.

 

Cuts diabetes
Mango leaves help normalise insulin levels in the blood. The traditional home remedy involves boiling leaves in water, soaking through the night and then consuming the filtered decoction in the morning. Mango fruit also has a relatively low glycemic index (41-60) so moderate quantities will not spike your sugar levels.

  1. Improves sex

 

Mangos are a great source of vitamin E. Even though the popular connection between sex drive and vitamin E was originally created by a mistaken generalization on rat studies, further research has shown balanced proper amounts (as from whole food) does help in this area.

  1. Improves digestion

 

Pawpaw is not the only fruit that contain enzymes for breaking down protein. There are several fruits, including mangoes, which have this healthful quality. The fiber in mangos also helps digestion and elimination.

  1. Remedy for Heat Stroke. Juicing the fruit from green mango and mixing with water and a sweetener helps to cool down the body and prevent harm to the body. This is also good for those who suffer from internal heat, hot flashes and anxiety.
  2. Boosts Immune system

 

 

 

The generous amounts of vitamin C and vitamin A in mango, plus 25 different kinds of carotenoids makes it an important natural immune booster. A strong and healthy immunity is essential for a healthy life. A good immunity protects against common illnesses such as colds, coughs and general weakness, and also against more serious and chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, arthritis and high blood pressure.

 

 

 

  1. Skin food

Do you know that mango is one of the best skin friendly medicine around? Just blending up the ripe mango along with the peel and applying to the face is fast and easy. Mangos contain beta-carotene, which is converted by your body to vitamin A. Both Vitamin A and vitamin C are crucial to skin self-repair. Mangos clear clogged pores and eliminate pimples. For those who want smooth, shinning and healthy looking, I advise you give mango a trial. Apply the fresh paste of mango to your face every night. It is a matter of weeks before you hear people commenting on your glowing skin.

 

 

  1. Blood tonic

 

 

While we tend to focus attention only on the mango fruit most of the time, it is important to remind ourselves of the other part of the mango tree. The stem bark of mango trees are good natural blood tonic. Boil half a kilogram of the stem of Mango in 10 liters of water and allow to infuse overnight. Drink half a glass twice daily.

 

 

  1. Fever

The soft, immature leaves of mango are good remedies for fevers. Boiling the matured leaves of mango along with other leaves such as Neem (dogoyaro) orange and lemon grass is a popular recipe for fever in Nigeria. However, the tender leaves of mango alone can be used for fever with very good results.

QUOTE:

Research has shown antioxidant compounds in mango fruit have been found to protect against colon, breast, leukemia and prostate cancers

 

 

QUOTE:

The generous amounts of vitamin C and vitamin A in mango, plus 25 different kinds of carotenoids makes it an important natural immune booster


Prozac in preschool

From the time he was a baby, Max, now 7, struggled with crippling anxiety.

“He would fly into screaming rages for no apparent reason,” says his mother, Stacy, a 44-year-old lawyer from Seattle who wanted to keep her family’s identity private. “He was constantly on edge.”

At 2 years old, Max began three years of behavioral therapy, “but it did nothing to help him,” Stacy says. His fear-driven outbursts continued into kindergarten. “Some days, he couldn’t even walk into class. I’d have 45 minutes of crying and screaming.”

Finally, at age 5, Max went on the antidepressant Prozac and his fear quickly subsided. “Prozac almost immediately brought our joyful, loving son back to us from his previous perennial fight-or-flight existence. He’s his best self every day,” says Stacy, whose only question is why she had resisted the medication for so long.

A surprising number of the nation’s youngest children are being prescribed psychiatric drugs, some younger than preschool, according to health-care industry data on physician prescriptions in the United States.

Widely reported data collected in 2014 from IMS Health show that more than eight million children are prescribed drugs for anxiety, depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and bipolar and behavioral disorders. More than one million of them are younger than 5.

But rigorous studies of these drugs in young children is “incredibly poor,” says Mary Margaret Gleason, a pediatric psychiatrist at Tulane University. “We don’t know much, especially with preschoolers,” she says. “The older kids get, their brains have already developed, and we have more information.”

The National Institutes of Health confirm that the use of antidepressants has “risen dramatically” since the 1990s. Anxiety is the most common type of mental-health disorder in children, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. About 10 percent of all young children deal with generalized anxiety, panic, separation anxiety, and phobias.

These disorders often go hand-in-hand with ADHD and depression. Symptoms can include fears about daily life, headaches and stomachaches, trouble concentrating or sleeping, and fear of social situations.

Studies on the safety and effectiveness of psychotropic drugs in young children are “limited,” according to the AAP, and only two studies have been conducted, both on children 7 and up.

A review of pediatric trials between 1988 and 2006 suggests the benefits of medication outweigh the risks in children with depression and anxiety disorders, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But at the same time, the CDC has shown increasing concern about off-label prescriptions for drugs to treat ADHD. An estimated 11 percent of all 4- to 17-year-olds have been diagnosed with the disorder, and that number continues to grow.

Some parents say they feel pressured by teachers and pediatricians to medicate for what they see as behavioral, not mental-health, problems.

Kirk Jennings Jr., an electrician from Prince George’s County, Maryland, says his son Jay was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 5, after his kindergarten teachers voiced “concerns” about disruptive behavior.

“At times he was a little loud and little too playful, but he’s still on the honor roll,” says Jennings, 37. “It seems teachers are now a little less tolerant.”

A therapist suggested home therapies could help Jay’s behavior, and his mother, who is separated from Jennings, agreed to medicate their son. Jennings disagreed.

Jay, now 10, has been on a list of “constantly changing” medications to stabilize his mood, with side effects such as dry eyes, irritable skin, fidgeting, nail-biting, and heightened fear.

Jennings says Jay’s behavior is “typical” for boys his age, and his parents’ separation triggered anxiety. “My biggest worry is the medication, which makes him a lot more calm, but is hindering his ability to cope. He is never truly learning how to behave.”

About one in five children will be diagnosed with a mental illness before the age of 17, according to the National Association for Mental Illness. But not all of the children will be treated.

For years, Heidi Walker of Kingwood, Texas, wasn’t able to get treatment for her 9-year-old son, Roanin, who now takes multiple drugs for ADHD, generalized anxiety, and severe sensory deficit. Walker says she was “totally against” medication when Roanin was first diagnosed at 2. But by kindergarten, his behavior was out of control.

“He would run out of the classroom,” says Walker, 37. “He got overwhelmed because of sensory issues in a group of people. If someone got too close, he’d attack them.”

At home, he never slept and acted impulsively, sometimes dangerously (he once took a knife to the television set). One time, Roanin became so angry, he peed on his brother’s pillow and filled his guitar with water from the toilet.

“We tried a diet change and that wasn’t working,” Walker says. “He was in therapy. We tried everything.”

When Roanin was 5, doctors prescribed a stimulant for violent outbursts. But there were side effects. The first drug made his aggression worse; another, too sleepy.

“It’s a double-edged sword,” Walker says. “I hate to medicate him, but if I don’t, he is more miserable, and so is everyone else in our house. He also tells me he feels off when he’s not taking his meds.”

Walker says she tries not to judge others for using medication. “Having dealt with this, it’s a personal choice,” she says.

But sometimes, doctors are too quick to prescribe before looking for physical causes, says Laura (not her real name), a 49-year-old from San Francisco. Her daughter was put on Prozac for anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Since preschool, she’s had stomachaches, tantrums, and insomnia. By 11, she was talking about suicide.

“It was really a puzzle,” Laura says. “We saw a family therapist and that didn’t help.”

After seeing multiple specialists, Laura’s daughter was diagnosed with celiac disease, an autoimmune condition that causes malnutrition and, in rare cases, psychiatric symptoms. Since removing gluten from her diet, the girl is off medication and her anxiety has improved, her mother says.

“I am not against medication in general,” Laura says. “It’s not a choice anyone makes lightly.”

For disruptive behavior and anxiety disorders, the first line of treatment should always be psychotherapy, which has more lasting effects than medication, says Gleason, the Tulane psychiatrist. “Mental-health issues in young children occur usually in the context of relationships, and we have treatments that are effective to help children build those relationships,” she says.

But, at the same time, these disorders in preschoolers often go untreated, because of lack of coordination between pediatricians and psychiatrists, social stigma, and insurance that typically only covers short-term treatment.

“There are adverse effects when untreated anxiety doesn’t allow a child to participate in school or social activities,” Gleason says. “We start with cognitive behavior therapy and if it’s not effective, we weigh medication.”

Such was the case with Stacy’s son Max, a gifted child whose anxiety was intractable, according to his therapists. When asked by his parents about taking medication, Max said he was eager to try anything that would make his constant terror “go away.”

“There is a strong societal bias away from medicating and an insistence it’s drugging your child and that they simply need to learn to cope,” Stacy says. “Why are we asking our youngest people, who don’t have the skills to cope and who are flooded with emotions, to deal with what adults have decided they can’t handle?”

Gleason says the medical community paradoxically continues to be in both “over-treatment and under-treatment mode” when it comes to mental disorders in children.

“As with all medications, there is a hope and a wish that there is an easy fix that doesn’t have side effects,” she says. “At the same time, we want to avoid giving children unstudied and untested medications. There are a lot of ripple effects.”

This story originally appeared as Prozac preschool on Pacific Standard, an editorial partner site. Subscribe to the magazine’s newsletter and follow Pacific Standard on Twitter to support journalism in the public interest.

Twin Sisters With Severe OCD Have Died In A Possible Double …

“When they were toddlers, putting on their shoes or socks was a long, drawn-out process because there couldn’t be any wrinkles in their socks and their shoes had to be tied just a certain way, and that process could go on half hour, 45 minutes, an hour,” their mom, Kathy Worland, said in a 2017 interview on The Doctors. (Worland did not respond to an interview request from BuzzFeed News.)

The sisters said on the show that they began cleanliness rituals in middle school, and by their early twenties were taking showers that lasted up to 10 hours, and would use an entire bar of soap.

They began to lose friends. ”When it takes you all day to take a shower, you are never going to meet them somewhere,” Sara said in the 2017 interview.

“It’s a cold, miserable, agonizing shower,” Amanda said in an interview with 9News in 2016. “We used hydrogen peroxide and alcohol. There was one point we were using so much hydrogen peroxide on our faces, it turned our eyebrows orange.”

The rituals were painful, debilitating, and exhausting, and did not relieve their symptoms, they said. “It hurts a lot — it’s ridiculously painful,” said Sara. “And it’s just something I did, like I had no choice. The OCD is saying, ‘Do this, do this,’ and I’m like, ‘OK, OK, I’m doing it.’”

“It’s like listening to somebody who is holding you at gunpoint — you absolutely have to do what they say, ” Amanda said. “We’ve tried all the medications — we’ve been on medication since we were 12.”

The twins couldn’t work, travel, or touch other people (including each other or their mother) due to the condition.

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